Sunday, November 1, 2015

New Release 15.11

Version 15.11 is now available for download. Here is the quick list of new things:
  • Added Rutt-Etra-Izer video filter.
  • Added audio/video device and screen capture for OS X.
  • Added screen capture for Windows.
  • Added keyboard shortcuts for trimming on Timeline: I, Shift+I, O, Shift+O.
  • Added support for ripple trimming on Timeline.
  • Added Application Log to View menu.
  • Added Save button to text viewer dialogs (logs, XML).
  • Added video Deinterlace, Interpolation, and Parallel-processing options to Encode panel.
  • Reorganize the Settings menu and added headings.
  • Added Close action to File menu.
The Rutt-Etra-Izer filter might seem like a strange addition, but there is an interesting backstory to it. When I discovered it and learned about the WebGL version by Felix Turner a couple of years ago, I thought I ought to be able to make it work with Shotcut's HTML filtering system (WebVfx). It requires the ability to read pixel data in JavaScript, which has not really worked correctly until the Shotcut upgrade to Qt 5.5. So, now we have it.

For a long while now, we have supported audio and video devices on Linux such as microphones, webcams, and more as well as screen capture. A year ago, we added A/V device support on Windows. With this release, thanks to the recent upgrade to FFmpeg 2.7, we extend device and screen capture coverage to all supported operating systems.

The last big new thing is a boost for trimming on the timeline. The new keyboard shortcuts only let you reduce the duration of a clip. It might be easier to think of this as a smarter way to split/slice a clip on the timeline, and it affects the clip under the playhead - not the currently selected clip. Very often, one - based on their technique - splits a clip and then removes one of the new pieces. Well, these trimming keyboard shortcuts are actually like two steps in one: split and remove. Just like elsewhere, there are two ways to remove: lift and ripple-delete. Ripple means to affect the position of all following clips and not leave (or extend) a gap. It is named after  the ripple effect of throwing a rock in a pond. That is why the timeline toolbar icon looks like a few circles. Oh, and that ripple button now takes on a newly expanded role of also toggling whether drag-trimming the ends of a clip with the mouse ripples the following shots. I will try to make a video soon to better explain and show all of this.